Post by Category : Kid Ease

Is it useful learning Alexander Technique at School and if so, why?

Every now and then I check in with the school children I teach to find out what they are learning from Alexander Technique. Here are some answers from class –

 

‘It is useful learning Alexander Technique at school because it teaches me how to go from really hyper to really relaxed quickly. It helps me stay calm and not react. When I do sports and things it helps me not get aches and pains. It also keeps me calm for exams, because I can switch off nervousness and get focussed instead.’ Alisia, age 13

 

‘My mum’s started to say my posture is better and I notice in the mirror I am not slouching.’ Josie, age 13

 

‘It trains your mind whilst you are still learning so you can get into good habits while you are still young.’ Anna, age 13

 

‘It’s changing habits for the younger generation, so that they don’t inherit the previous generations flaws. It is good to start at a young age at high school because we then have guidance as to what will benefit you most, what is right for you, which makes it easier to live a day to day life.’ Josie, age 13

 

‘Alexander Technique helps you let go. It gives you another perspective. So it is not so stressful dealing with annoying people at school, or people who find you annoying.’ Josie, age 13

 

‘It slows everything down and helps you appreciate every second. You notice everything, all the senses and sounds. Maisie, age 14

 

‘School is stressful and when you do Alexander Technique it helps you remember how calm and open you can be.’  Esme, age 13

 

‘If you have done Alexander Technque in a room in the school and then you go back into it another time the room reminds you to feel calm. That is why it is good doing it in school.’ Josie, age 13

 

‘You feel more responsible for your body and you get the gist of how it works more. That makes you feel safer and more comfortable.’ Marie age 14

 

‘I find I concentrate more after Alexander Technique and stay focussed in class. I find  am kinder and nicer to people after doing Alexander Technique.’ Xander age 13

 

‘It is tiring and busy at school. Alexander Technique gives you half a period to put things into perspective and think about keeping yourself healthy. It doesn’t take long in Alexander Technique but it helps it make possible all the things we have to do. I get better results when I take a break and gather my thoughts.  Xander age 13

 

‘It helps you concentrate. It helps you learn a different way of learning.’ Mika, age 14

 

‘It’s fun learning about your body.’ Lucy, age 14

 

‘It teaches you awareness, it helps you pay attention and listen to your body and be in the moment. It helps you let go and unwind.’ Dominic, age 14

 

‘It makes me think about things I’ve never thought about before about my body. It makes me aware of myself which is useful because it makes me more interested in how I am.’ Stephanie, age 15

 

‘I think Alexander Technique helps you mentally and physically. For example, if you have aches – people don’t realise that it is yourself that is making it happen!

It makes you self aware with your interactions with other people and your interactions with yourself. It makes you strong minded or strong willed enough to stand your ground when you are confronted with people or situations that can be tricky or difficult to deal with, especially at school when there is the stress of peer pressure.’ Hannah, age 16

 

‘It helps me be less reactive. You become more open minded to new ideas and different ideas, rather than saying ‘no that won’t work.’ You don’t jump to conclusions as easily. Esme, age 13

 

‘It helps you be more comfortable with your decisions.’ Dominic, age 14

 

‘I helps with your confidence speaking to people, you look and feel more confident.’ Mika, age 15

 

‘When I open up my body, I open up my mind’ Xander, age 13

 

If you are interested in Alexander Technique for your children, here are two things that I have produced that may be of interest

 

Body Magic, audio download for semi supine

The Daily Ease – A Walk in the Woods, a colouring story book

 

 

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The Giraffe

The Giraffe by Kirsten Harris

 

‘You’re having a laugh’ said the baby giraffe
‘If you think I’m going up there!
I’ve no head for heights, they give me a fright
I don’t want to be tall, it’s not fair!’

 

‘Your thinking’s absurd’ twittered the bird
Looping high fives in the air
‘Forward! Up to the zone, for a confident home
Think up, planet up, it’s a dare!’

 

‘I’m shy’ he replied ‘I’ve no time for the sky
It’s odd and it’s weird being me
I’ll slump and I’ll slouch, it won’t hurt much … Oh ouch!
My neck doesn’t feel very free!’

 

‘Structure your bones like a house’, said the mouse
‘To balance your head without care
Free your neck in your mind. Think up, you will find
You’re giraffey not mousey –  so there!’

 

The thing that is strange is how it is arranged
The giraffe, the wee mouse, even me:
Seven bones in the neck, yes the same – what the heck …
Am I human or mouse? Which is me?

 

(Think I’ll be a giraffe!)

 

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I’ve painted giraffes many times since this amazing encounter in Botswana 20 years ago. I had the idea then to write something Alexander Technique inspired about a giraffe. It has only taken  twenty years for the idea to be born in this verse. Hope you like it. I want to do a better illustration next.

 

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The Light by Kirsten Harris, Oil on Canvas, 110 x 110 cm Sold

 

Something else you might like –  HERE is a link to an Alexander Technique colouring book. Each double page spread has AT inspired prose and a drawing to colour … for anyone who wants to share or learn AT in an easy, different way …

The Daily Ease, A Walk in the Woods Colouring Book

 

What people are saying – “Within the words and magical illustrations are lots of wonderful reminders of the wisdom and teachings of the Alexander Technique and how they can be so easily incorporated into our daily life to bring us ease and flow.” Sally, Scotland

 

 

 

 

 

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‘Doing Alexander Technique at School is Legendary!’

‘Doing Alexander Technique at school is legendary and you’re a legend Miss!’

Or so I was informed by a seventeen year old at the high school where I teach Alexander Technique yesterday!

‘Oh, that sounds good! Is it? No-one has ever called me that, in fact I am not entirely sure I know what legendary and being a legend means. We didn’t use that expression when I was at school.’

 

‘It is very good Miss, not everyone is a legend!’ (They proceeded to tell me which teachers were legends and which were not, but that is classified information!)

 

So here is the definition of why doing Alexander Technique at school is legendary from a  group of high school students in Scotland  –

 

‘A legend is laid back, cool, understands people, treats everyone equally and is confident but not cocky.’

‘A legend doesn’t make people feel bad about themselves.’

‘If you persist with Alexander Technique it helps you to become more of a legend as you treat people with more understanding. You notice things about other people that you wouldn’t notice before which makes you more understanding and able to relate to others which makes you more of a legend.’

‘You have to be in a group of people to establish whether someone is a legend.’

‘Having Alexander Technique body awareness allows you to be more individual and you don’t care what other think. Legends don’t care what others think, and often have some  quirky personality trait or thing that makes them stand out.’

‘Taking innovative, creative, fun time to do Alexander Technique is legendary. A legend would do that.’

‘A legend is kind, and does kind things for others.’

‘You are not necessarily a legend in everyone’s eyes.’

‘Doing Alexander Technique at school sets you apart from other people because it is distinctive and not mainstream. People don’t know what it is and that is legendary. Yoga is like Starbucks, it is mainstream of the health industry – like a caramel frappuccino. Alexander Technique is legendary, like a quadruple espresso, getting you high on life!’

 

So now you know  – Alexander Technique is legendary!

 

I love my job!

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Things you might like

Body Magic, audio download for semi supine, as pictured – CLICK HERE

An Alexander Technique inspired colouring story book – CLICK HERE

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‘It’s the Jeremy Kyle Show Miss!’

‘This class of Alexander Technique is like being on the Jeremy Kyle Show Miss!’

 

Two separate groups of children spontaneously likened Alexander Technique to being on the Jeremy Kyle show at school this week.
A hilarious observation with a good point!

 

Why did they liken learning AT at school to the Jeremy Kyle Show? Because I was teaching them to really listen to each other. To stop habitually reacting and competing and give each other a chance to speak. Harder than it may sound.

 

They are bright children, all specialist musicians.
However there was a distinct lack of listening skills.
They were engaging in ‘I am right and you are wrong’ tit for tats, and telling each other off in a rather ‘parental manner’ rather than listening to each other.
Result – frustration … tight necks …

 

Reactive escalations with their characters and habitual relationships to each other getting in the way of constructive learning from each other, or me for that matter! They all have good personalities individually but were definitely annoying each other as a group.

 

Listening skills required … they are musicians in the making after all. Working in harmony is essential.

 

We worked on not interrupting, pausing, waiting, inhibiting, listening actively, giving each other space and time to be free to speak and to feel heard …
As an adult it is a good exercise in self awareness too – teaching a class of unruly kids who are falling out with each other!

 

The improvement in the atmosphere, quality of interchange and general ease in the room from thinking about listening resulted in the quip ‘Learning Alexander Technique is like being on the Jeremy Kyle show, Miss!’

 

Maybe dodgy day time reality television has its uses after all!

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(For non UK readers, the TV show referred to invites people to resolve their differences on air, usually resulting in a lot of shouting!)

 

Things you may like

Body Magic audio – here

A Walk in the Woods Colouring Story Book – here

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Bone Up!

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Bone Up!

by

Kirsten Harris

 

‘Bare bones of matter, skeleton insight –

Spaced joints, mobile, long, supporting, freely upright!

Strong ‘Architect’ designed skeleton, not a bony wrecked fright

Haunted by creaking by day and by night!

 

One hundred years… I will regenerate ten skeleton bloody and white

Walking with your skeleton keeps bones strong, alright!’

 

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‘Bone up on your anatomy’,  the little mouse advises….

He is having a light bulb moment…

It is a good idea to know your bones!

He is studying Alexander Technique!

 

The skeleton, universal man, is influenced by space, up flow, earth, gravity, time…

 

The human lies in bed, haunted by ghosts…awake… the past intrudes… worries… fears….aching bones…. she is not comfortable in her bed.

She should be warm and cosy but she is scrunched up….no ease here!

 

Under the bed a little mouse lies in semi supine…

He is saying – don’t lie there in pain missus –  lie in constructive rest, let go…

Visualise your skeleton…

Let it space out…

As you space out…

 

The dog is blissed out on his back. Happy dog! Body Aware pup.

 

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Image and words form The Daily Ease 2017 calendar.

To buy a copy of this fun calendar and teaching aid  CLICK HERE

Alexander Technique wisdom for children and adults alike!

 

 

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Game of Bones

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Game of Bones

by Kirsten Harris

 

On my way to teach Alexander Technique to high school children this week I popped into an antique and curiosity shop where I happened upon one lone vertebra.

Lumbar 4 to be precise.

I asked to buy it and the shop keeper kindly gave it to me, bemused by my enthusiasm.

The single model vertebra became the talking point for class and wow, did the students amaze me with their observations and insights.

 

Here are some notes taken from the children’s thoughts.  They started with describing it and went on to see the bone as a metaphor for the human condition – choices in life – a game of bones.

 

To quote –

‘It feels like coral, like a structured wildlife habitat…

It looks neat, strong, rounded, shaped… it looks like white chocolate… it looks like a fish… symmetrical, exact… it looks like it should be spongy…’

 

‘It looks like it has many purposes – multi functional…

It looks solid and reliable…

Intricate, spacious, chunky…

It looks like a hand with fingers coming out of it…

It looks doughy, like stretched bread – rising and proven…’

 

‘It looks like a jigsaw…

It looks supportive and the supporter…

If we didn’t have vertebrae we’d look like jelly fish…

Many together create strength…

They depend on one another…

It looks like it is reliant on other pieces to complete its purpose…

It’s a bit like people, it doesn’t look like it work very well on it’s own!

It looks like it has been shaped by life…’

 

‘It seems unimportant in itself, out of context…

It looks useless unless you put it into the bigger picture..

One vertebra missing is like taking middle C out of the piano… …You don’t know it’s missing until you go to play.’

 

‘It looks contradictory!’

‘What do you mean by contradictory?’ I asked

 

‘It has space and is dense..

hardy and flexible…

solid and complex…

chunky and delicate…

calm and tempestuous…’

 

‘What do you mean by calm and tempestuous?’

 

‘Well the chunky bit looks calm…

It looks very encompassing and focussed in its role…’

 

‘This vertebra is a bit like me…’

 

‘If I use the chunky bit and let it support me I feel calm….

Some people lean more towards the calm or the tempestuous…

It is like there is an epidemic of slump and people are leaning into the complicated side of the vertebra and becoming complicated and confusing….’

 

‘The complicated side of the vertebra looks like an explosion, but the calm bit looks like a platform. It looks reassuring.

It looks like a bean or a stage…shaped and calm…’

 

‘If you lean into the complicated side it slumps your nerves, I suppose, and you become more stupid…’

 

‘Can we lie in semi supine now miss?’

 

I learned a lot from the children and really love the idea of the spine being calm or tempestuous. So, to use the wisdom of children, which way are you leaning your vertebrae?

 

To learn more about the benefits of semi supine CLICK HERE TO LINK TO MY MEDIA DOWNLOAD

BODY MAGIC.

 

Weight Bearing

 

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The Giraffe

The Giraffe

by Kirsten Harris

 

Like us, giraffe have seven vertebrae in the neck.

I find this fact fascinating.

Graceful, long necked, elegant, beautiful, crazy giraffe – your design is much like mine.

 

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‘You’re having a laugh,’ said the baby giraffe

‘If you think I’m going up there!

I’ve no head for heights

They give me a fright

I don’t want to be tall, it’s not fair!’

 

This image and verse is about self acceptance – the power of thinking up!

 

The baby giraffe hides shyly between his mother’s legs…

But hiding is not working…little messages are coming up from the ground…

‘man up’

‘up, up, up’

‘go up in the world’

‘choose up’

‘take me up’….

 

The little mice are comfortably nice…

 

I teach Alexander Technique to high school children, age 12 – 18

 

I want them to have a confident self image no matter what size they are…

Teaching children the power of up is a joy! I am teaching how to make a powerful choice.

 

Up they think and up they go…

Finding confidence, inner strength, ease, poise, laughter, happiness, lightness, feeling more themselves…

Little ones discover they are ‘less of a pushover’ than bigger kids with no understanding of the power of up…’Wow, thinking up gives you superhuman powers, miss!’ they report. Happy me! Another young person who loves the Alexander Technique as much as I do!

Tall gangly teens (me at school) start enjoying  their full height…

Being themselves without resistance and fear…

Unlimited potential….

Fearlessly up…

A valuable tool for life…. up, up, up, think up!

‘Why doesn’t everyone at school learn the Alexander Technique?’ The children constantly ask me….

 

This daft illustration reminds us that we have a daily easy choice …up

It’s easy to think up!

The bird words move the giraffes long back up, singing – ‘big it up!’

 

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Illustration and verse from The Daily Ease 2017 Calendar

To see more or buy the Daily Ease 2017 Calendar CLICK HERE

A bit of Alexander Technique fun for your teaching room….

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65 Life Lessons from My Dog

65 Life Lessons from My Dog

by Kirsten Harris

 

1. Have a good stretch and yawn first thing in the morning. It feels great.

 

2. If there is a human being about lie on your back and get your tummy tickled. Tickling is happy.

 

3. Morning grooming sessions make you feel good for the day. Nobody likes a smelly dog.

Especially look after your feet. You can’t walk without them.

 

5. Eat your food with gusto and pure pleasure.

 

6. Drink plenty of water.

 

7. Be totally delighted to see your friends. Greet them with enthusiasm and joy.

 

8. Be fascinated by the sights, sounds and smells around you. The best things in life really are free.

 

9. Playing or going for a walk with someone is better than on your own. Run for Fun.

 

10. If you need to howl. Do it!

 

11. Smile and wag your tail a lot, it will keep your back free. Dance like a dog everyday.

 

12. It is OK to have a snooze in the day time. Dogs loves it when you lie on the floor. Be more dog and rest inbetween activity. It’s good for your back.

 

13. Get some training. Practise makes perfect. Being skilled is pure pleasure for you and the people around you.

 

14. It is possible to be totally relaxed and alert at the same time. Alexander Technique’s constructive rest (semi-supine) is the human equivalent of your dog sleeping with one eye open.

 

15. Worry Less. Muddy floors can be cleaned. Enjoy getting muddy feet in the first place.

 

16. Dont compare yourself with the other bitches! Be accepting.

 

17. It feels good to give and get strokes from others. Give and receive praise.

 

18. Make yourself pant breathlessly from having fun in the world at least once a day.

 

19. ‘NO!’  is a really important word. Use it.

 

20. Go outside several times a day to refresh yourself.

 

21 Have boundaries. Your space is your space, protect it from invaders.

 

22. Don’t pick fights. Stand up for yourself if necessary. Don’t cower, but exiting fast or going around something to avoid confrontation is often the best strategy. Fighting doesn’t occur if you know how to look after yourself.

 

23. Commitment brings joy.

 

24. Trust your instincts.

 

25. Everyday is an adventure. Going on trips is an adventure. Trust the unknown. Dogs never know what you have planned.

 

26. Ball games are fun.

 

27. Have a sense of humour and be a bit naughty sometimes.

 

28. Bugs, flies, moths and bees are fascinating.

 

29. Staying a dancing hands length away from being captured is a good game.

 

30. Have your own space, where you find peace and ease.

 

31. Sofas are great but sometimes it really is more comfortable to lie on the floor. Rolling around on the floor is really really good too.

 

32.  Different dogs have different energy levels and personalities. They are all loveable. Accept yourself.

 

33. Develop your listening skills.

 

34. Sitting at someone else’s feet is a mark of respect.

 

35 Be aware.

 

36. A little treat for a job well done makes life flow and brings happiness and joy.

 

37. Keep a little treat ‘up your sleeve’ at all times, you never know when you might need a reward.

 

38 Be loyal and honest. Dogs don’t lie.

 

39 A good companion and friend is the best thing in the world.

 

40. Walking everyday keeps you in good shape.

 

41. Some humans make better leaders than others and get more respect.

 

42. Slippers are great.

 

43. Toys that squeak must be destroyed as fast as possible.

 

44 It is important to respect cows, sheep and horses, but it is OK to chase crows out of the garden.

 

45 Some ‘cats’ are weird and need assessing before approaching.

 

46. Humans are a bit slow and clumsy but are generally nice and like to be loved

 

47. Humans that spend too long on the computer are boring and missing out on great opportunities for adventures and walks.

 

48. Humans don’t like arse licking.

 

49 Don’t chase cars.

 

50. Always look for the most comfortable place to sit. Sit nicely.

 

51 Find a favourite relaxation spot outside to watch the world go by.

 

52. Dogs are happy when you are happy. Be happy

 

53 The countryside is freer than the city.

 

54. You can communicate with everyone, even if you don’t speak the same language. Be friendly to strangers.

 

55. Don’t hurt people. People don’t like being bitten.

 

56. Don’t steal other people’s stuff. Slippers are fair game!

 

57. Trust people unless they hurt you. Then refuse to go near them.

 

58. Breathe out deeply with contented pleasure when letting go into rest.

 

59. Explore your surroundings with new eyes and enthusiasm everyday. It is full of wonder and delight.

 

60. Respect the environment. Don’t ‘shit’ in someone else’s paradise. If you do, clear up the mess.

 

61. It is possible to be poised in activity. The eyes lead the body follows, watch a dog catch a ball, it will teach you how the body is co-ordinated.

 

62. It is OK to drop the ball.

 

63. Don’t worry. If you think it’s a dog’s life, be more dog.

 

64. Get messy. Use your body. Explore. Get your feet wet. Run into the sea. Dig in the earth. Enjoy Life.

 

65. Love is unconditional.

 

(65 Life Lessons from my Dog – copyright Kirsten Harris July 2016)

 

 

 

 

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Skills teens say they learn having Alexander lessons at school

I asked a group of high school teenagers what skills they th

 

-confindence

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40 reasons teenagers say learning Alexander Technique at school is good.

I asked my high school students why they think having Alexander Technique lessons at school is a good idea. Here is what they said

 

1. helps sore backs

2. helps learn about body

3. fun

5. educational

6. social, group application

7. anti – stress

8. relaxation before exams

9. a different zone

10. puts you in control

11. neck is free

12. stop being hyper

13. teachers need it for stress

14. physically and mentally good for you

15. right state of mind to concentrate

16. great life skill

17. easier breathing

18. awareness of tongue

19. confidence

20. teenagers have insecurities, it helps.

21. calming if tired

22. helps you sleep

23. choice to be calm or active

24. no disadvantage to learning it

25. relieves stress and strain of school

26. makes you forget what is actually going on

27. notice weird habits in adults

28. look forward to Alexander Technique as first time in week taught to stop

29. good age to put in solid foundations for movement

30. if I had done it when I was younger I wouldn’t be in so much pain. (16 yrs boy)

31. useful defence mechanism so am not ruled by insecurities

32. work much better not work much harder!

33. concentration feels right

34. just stop reacting to nonsense

35. things change

36. ‘I’ve been doing AT since I was in the womb!’ (Harry, age 16)

37. get frustrated but then I come back to myself and then I can do it

38. taking responsibility for ‘fixing’ ourselves

39. not blaming others

40. gives you a break from learning between periods, thats relaxing and helpful

 

 

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12 – 18 year olds asked – What do you learn in Alexander Technique class? Amazing replies

I asked my 12 – 18 year old High School students what they thought they were learning in Alexander Technique classes. Here are there amazing replies.

 

– Observation of self and others

– Anatomy, functional, useful and practical

– A kind of X-ray vision, seeing the internal structure

– Balance, dynamic poise, co-ordination

– Letting go, noticing tension, noticing habits

– Improved performance

– Being able to move more freely

– Awareness, spatial and personal

– How thinking effects functioning and vice versa

– Time to think about what’s around you

– Enhanced sensory perception, increase in sensitivity

– Increased confidence

– Improved relationships with self and others

– How to stay calm in situations, stress relief

– How to deal with nerves

– Helps with relationships, can stay calm even if others are hyper

– The difference between doing and non-doing

– Listening skills, to your own body and to others

– Releasing held muscle, releasing stress

– Looking after yourself, knowing what is efficient body use

– Finding yourself, finding your individuality

– Teaching skills

– Mind into/over matter, less is more

– Learning control over body, using mind to get rid of habits

– Initiative

– Dynamic rest, releasing muscles into length and width

– Functional physics of being alive, gravity, forces and what you do with it once you know it. How to apply it

– Understanding what parts of body are weight bearing and what’s not

– Synchronising – with each other and self, interacting calmly

– Socialising and co-operation skills

– Looking after yourself, being able to ask for what you need

– Communication skills, working on self and communicating process with each other. Thinking about what you are doing and learning to communicate it.

– Developing imagination, discovery

– Accessing a dream state, an endless road, but still awake

– Using imagination to ease out

– Being able to switch off quickly

– Thinking about connecting you body with activity, instead of just your ‘to do’ list

– How to work on yourself

– How to let go of shoulders etc, and how to teach others to do it

– Easy interaction between people

– Stretch and Release

– Hand eye co-ordination

– Patience, pausing, taking time

– Awareness of timing, spatial timing

– How to stay calm in emotional situations

– The ability to breathe freely

– How to convey your perspective of things in life and listen to others

– How to be comfortable around other people

– Learning to be yourself

– Going with the flow

– Getting better at walking

– How thinking effects movement instantly

– Using the floor and gravity to let go, understanding weight

– Learning to ignore distractions/ stay in your own zone focus

– Kinaesthetic movement awareness

– How breathing can be inspirational. How to ‘kick start’ better breathing

– Enhanced performance skills

– Getting out of your own way

 

 

2015

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Children talking about the Alexander Technique

Children talking about the Alexander Technique

 

“The Alexander Technique eases you into the day be giving you the awareness of how to release your stressful thoughts.”

 

Harmony – age 15

 

“The Alexander Technique eases your mind to make you more productive for the day ahead with little simple things you can do – such as lying in semi supine.”

 

Jack – age 15

 

“Daily Alexander Technique is very calming, especially lying on the floor and knowing how to release my arms.”

 

Max – age 15

 

“Alexander Technique puts your mind at ease. i like it when you lie on the floor and then you get in the zone. I let go into this awesome place.”

 

Sean – age 14

 

“Alexander Technique helps your neck, your ams, your legs, your head, your spine. It helps you get into yourself and be free. Into a place where you are most calm and your inner self is at peace.”

 

Esme – age 14

 

“Alexander Technique makes you feel more aware of what’s going on. It makes you think more clearly so you can react to what is going on better.”

 

Ewan – age 15

 

“Alexander Technique helps you release tension. Its helped me learn how to let go and helped me stand straighter because I am tall. It has helped me feel a lot more confident and happier. I used to be really scared of everything.”

 

Anna – age 12

 

I feel Alexander Technique has helped improve my awareness, When I first started at school I used to be really sleepy in the morning and have a sore back. Now my back is fine. I feel Alexander Technique has helped my structure. I feel quite laid back almost. I feel more natural playing piano and sax. My fingers don’t feels so tense but more natural on the piano.”

 

Leon – Age 12

 

“Alexander Technique makes me feel more confident and learn things you didn’t know before, like being aware of where you hold your tongue to control yourself with more ease.”

 

Chiara – age 12

 

“I like it because I’m not as tense. My shoulders are not so tense. It’s easier for me to walk about on my crutches because I’m aware of how to release my shoulders.”

 

Ruairi – age 12

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Children Being Profound about the Alexander Technique!

Children being profound about the Alexander Technique!

 

“ I find it makes everything easier because there is less tension throughout my being. I get tense when I start thinking too much about being right as opposed to being free and allowing myself to be wrong.

Allowing myself to be wrong is useful as I am putting less pressure on myself. I can think more clearly. I have more choice and I can appreciate being right more easily. My habitual experiences are not in the way of my development.”

 

Ethan – age 13 years

 

 

“ Alexander Technique is very helpful for me because I am a stressful person inside. The Alexander Technique has helped me release mental and physical tension which frees my body and makes me feel calm and collected. It also expands my mind to different ideas, to look at things from a different perspective. You concentrate on anything and think forward and up and soon I find my neutral zone to feel and think calmly and it feels balanced and easier to live life.

It helps with my creativity because it is an experimental way of thinking about daily activity and it helps enlarge my creative side because there are no mistakes and even if there might be a mistake you can learn to come back to your poised mind and inner self. You can just step back and acknowledge where you ant wrong and think forward and up again.”

 

Hannah – age 13 years

 

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Why is Alexander Technique not Compulsory at school, asks 12 year old boy!

This is a completely spontaneous comment from a 12 year old boy I teach at school. I am lucky to teach the Alexander Technique at a high school in Edinburgh.

 

“I think Alexander Technique should be compulsory at all schools because people need to be more aware of the way they think and do. As I learn less is more I have a whole new perspective and the ability to completely stress relieve just by doing nothing for 17 minutes and thinking about myself in different ways.”

 

Ethan, age 12

 

 

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Kids quotes on Alexander Technique

When we let go we get more energy – Lola age 12

 

Semi supine uncrumples you – Mia age 14

 

If everyone did the Alexander Technique there would be no more wars because everyone would be controlled and calm and in the right mind.’ Jack age 15

 

The Alexander Technique is a peaceful science – Kier age 14

 

The Alexander Technique is a relaxative! – Sean age 12

 

Semi supine makes you feel happier and be confident with your body. Mia age 14

 

Semi supine feels like it will help you cope. Victor age 13

 

If you’re depressed and you think ‘forward and up’ you may feel a bit better. It’s also a good position to think. For example if you have two periods of maths it’s really good to think’ forward and u’p so my back isn’t sore and my neck doesn’t get cramp. Victor Age 13

 

Semi supine makes me feel more ready to do stuff – Lola age 12

 

Semi supine takes your mind off worries. – Lucy age 15

 

It’s more than just lieing on the ground because my brain feels more ready to learn, less resistant. Saskia – age 12

 

Resting in semi supine empties my mind, it’s time to process so I can take more in – Anna age 17

 

Things you might like –

Alexander Technique inspired colouring book – Click here

Body Magic, Audio for letting go in semi supine – Click here

 

 

 

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Kids Body Mapping the Skeleton

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These fantastic drawings by my first and second year students at the Edinburgh School of Music at Broughton High School are not copied from any picture of the skeleton. They are done from talking through the anatomy of the skeleton with them to create there own body map, developing X-ray vision as they observe each other and thinking about the size, shape and feeling of  there own bones under the skin and muscle.  I think the results are amazing. A good bony body map greatly improves understanding of movement towards greater poise.

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